"Life is the dancer and you are the dance."
Eckhart Tolle

Friday, April 15, 2011

"The Sisters" NaPoWriMo #15/ Big Tent Prompt-7. Write a poem that starts, “Legend says ______.”

Legend says …
Maria’s children followed her to a rising river
Now she cries in the night,
"O-h-h-h, my children!"
La Llorona circling in the darkness,
weeping against the sky,
wandering alone for eternity …
sapphire tears fall from the heavens
Searching for the children,
her resonance is all around me

La Bruja, nocturnal raptor,
owl eyes, strong sleek wings …
how bewitching it is to fly
Searching for souls
lifts you to mountain tops
She chokes you with kisses
while you plead “don’t leave me lifeless”
She returns you to the arms of your sister …
do you still love me beautiful Llorona?

When darkness comes she’ll be hidden in shadows;
you can hear her grievous cry as owls fly overhead



 Latin American legends:
“La Bruja Lechuza” is a Mexican legend. She is a witch who comes to a house in the form of a giant owl-type bird, to take away someone who is close to death.

“La Llorona” translates to “The Weeping Woman”
Here's a link about her:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Llorona

42 comments:

  1. "Searching for souls / lifts you to mountain tops" - that's such a beautiful line. Great subjects for a legend poem, mythical and mysterious.

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  2. Great introduction to these characters.

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  3. I haven't heard of this legend. Thanks for the intro!

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  4. "La Bruja Lechuza"
    New phrase, new concept to me. Thanks. I'll probably write something.

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  5. So powerful these legends. I'm rather immersed in the Australian ones at present.

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  6. Beautiful line—

    La Llorona circling in the darkness,
    weeping against the sky,

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  7. How interesting this legend is and how beautiful and haunting is the poem you penned. I didn't know this legend but my brother came home from the SW after he was diagnosed with cancer. He talked about an owl that visited him regularly at his campsite. Wish I could tell him this legend. I love your writing!

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  8. Pamela, Thank you for sharing the legends with us. They served you and your readers well in this piece. Powerful piece.
    ~Brenda

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  9. I agree...this is so mysterious and haunting!

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  10. A legendary response to the prompt. What beautiful words you have written.

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  11. Creative prompt ... sad and beautiful words! And we are halfway to the finish line!

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  12. A legend born aloft on wings, always troubled, always seeking.

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  13. Pamela- Beautiful and vivid piece!

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  14. Enjoyed the cultural references; and could relate as one who lives in the desert southwest

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  15. Powerful legends and so nicely written. Thanks for sharing with us :)
    Have a great weekend
    Marinela x


    Short Poems

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  16. Awards for you, thanks for the support!

    Bless your talent.

    Happy Friday!

    xox

    let me know if you are interested in working for Bluebell Books and do posts on Saturdays.

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  17. They are actually two different legends, Tilly.

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  18. It was new to me as well, Ron, until moving here.

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  19. Mr. Walker, I combined two legends here. There are people here, who say they have seen La Bruja.

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  20. I would like to read about them, Dave. I know of some others from the Celts.

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  21. These legends are haunting, to say the least, Jeanne.

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  22. Enchanting and haunting, Annell.

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  23. Kim, I would imagine there are some similarities in your area.

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  24. Thanks, short poems and bluebell!

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  25. Oh this is a fantastic poem! The legend, the poetry of the names, "weeping against the sky, wandering alone for eternity", "how bewitching it is to fly searching for souls"......perfection! I love the "grievous cries, as owls fly overhead." Beautiful. I wrote a poem a while back about an oracle, an owl, who visited me after my mother's death.....so this poem really resonated with me. Beautiful writing, Pamela.

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  26. Ah the wailing woman,heard of that legend before. But not the La Bruja. Excellent choice (and poem) since the fit together so well

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  27. Legends about passing from one world to another are always fascinating - you captured that mystery well.

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  28. Beautiful stories, images. Lovely combinations.

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  29. Hey, I followed you here from Big Tent - I read a lot of Chican@ literature last year so this really resonated with me.

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  30. Pam, your poetry of late captivates me in the deepest sense. Amazing fare!

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  31. Death imaged as a mythic figure is powerful and richly evocative of our hopes and fears, and the blame we cast out when we've lost loved ones. We pause; we ponder. We feel stalked; we are bereaved. You've caught all of that in La Bruja and La Llorona. A poem casting its long shadow and that is superb, Pam. Superb. Thank you...

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