"Life is the dancer and you are the dance."
Eckhart Tolle

Friday, February 11, 2011

A Blanket of Hope Big Tent Poetry #40-a cure for what ails you

A young girl put out the flames
on a horse’s mane as he ran
aimlessly through a forest.
You held a baby within your heart for
nourishment of his soul
so no more hunger would exist.
We watched an eagle fly,
crows sitting in the trees,
geese swimming on a lake.
A young boy demolished bombs
that were waiting to be released,
to send a blanket of poison over an already barren land.
While he held on to the possibilities of
peace, hoping he could make a difference.
A child swam in the ocean, watched dolphins
play, observed pelicans feeding,
 dipping on the water’s surface.
Tranquility has finally found a place to rest.



Process notes:
I don’t worry about money, there
will always be a need for more,
I don’t worry about work, I’m satisfied
with my job. Love is and has always
been a pain in the neck, but I love my
husband and I believe he loves me.
Or I’m quite sure he wouldn’t put up
with some of my BS.
What bothers me and what I wish I
could change is the way things are
headed. Humanity has taken a
turn for the worse.

36 comments:

  1. Your process notes are as much of a poem as your poem, and that contains several cures.

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  2. I love the tranquil cure of the world's ailments. Especially nice is the last line!

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  3. Beautiful imagery and very profound. The first line lured me in.

    I agree with your process notes statement... sad and scary is the road we are heading down.

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  4. Faint hints of Dylan's 'Hard Rain...' in the chain of dreamlike images. Very effective as it works its way towards resolution.

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  5. Liked your descriptions & yes, humanity is headed in the wrong direction. People are different from when I was a child.

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  6. Oh wow...this!

    Sort of a surreal yet solid dream.

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  7. As Viv said, the process-poem informs the poem itself in a really cool way... I like that idea of tranquility finding a place to rest. We count on tranquility to come along and relax us, but where does tranquility go when it needs a vacation itself?

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  8. Wow, this is really lovely. Those first 3 lines are fantastic.

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  9. Pam, we all need such a blanket of hope. Oh that it were so. The shape of your poem was interesting to me. Undoubtedly (?) unintentional, but it seemed to me the shape of a mushroom cloud. Oh that ALL bombs would be demolished.

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  10. Thanks for your images of tranquility, Pamela. Your process notes read so honestly.

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  11. Your poem has so much peacefulness contained within it, and yet your process notes do not convey the same sentiments. I am worried about things too (locally as well as globally) and they make me wake at night sometimes, wondering the future of things. I think your work today summed it all up quite well.

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  12. What images... I really like that young boy demolishing bombs, a quiet moment of bravery.

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  13. Such beautiful images. We share the same source of blues. I think the best thing to do is strive to "be the change we wish to see"...

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  14. Thanks for the trip. I'm chilling.

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  15. Strong poem and process notes. Excellent!

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  16. Viv, not my intention, but it did turn out that
    way it seems.

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  17. A very uncertain future indeed, Laurie.

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  18. Dick, Dylan wow! I am quite flattered.

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  19. As when I was a child too, Marian.

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  20. Much that I write Mark is surreal:)

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  21. Thanks Twitches and I wasn't sure if it
    was, too strong.

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  22. Mary, a blanket of hope would be nice.
    I didn't notice the shape, ha!
    I hate bombs.

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  23. Irene, that is me being humble:)
    I can be a real pain in the ass.

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  24. Wouldn't it be wonderful, James.

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  25. It is the only place we can start, Kelly.

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  26. Seems a lot did, Gautami. Thanks:)

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  27. Thanks for the nice comment, Susan:)

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  28. RJ, there is so much to worry about, that the
    last place I am worried about is my life.
    Home, work etc ... I worry more for my daughter
    and the younger generations. I had a good
    life growing up. Simple and nice. All this technology is troublesome.

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  29. I would love to see your process notes woven into the poem - they inform each other wonderfully.

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  30. I agree that your process notes came out in a very poetic way. I like the way your poem moves around from person to person, each with the desire and action to quench the world's need.

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  31. Donna I should give that a try.
    It might be interesting to see
    what turns out.

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  32. Jeanne, that was totally unintentional,
    thanks for the comment.

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